Strategies to boost donations at crowdfunding sites

Computer scientists have shown how crowdfunding websites can use data science to boost cash value of donations. Their research confirms, among other...

Self-discipline and the power of social pressure

A big part of self-discipline comes from social pressure. This is how people in the military can become very disciplined, particularly in special forces. They don’t want to hold their team back, so they have to do their best.

Red? Blue? Yellow? How logo color affects feelings about your brand

A researcher has found that the specific colors used in a company’s logo have a significant impact on how that logo, and the brand as a whole, is viewed by consumers.

Why willpower alone is not enough to motivate you

Unconscious motivation plays a substantial role in how we respond to challenges. Find out how much.

How to make your beliefs work for you

None of us make decisions based on reality itself. We make decisions based on our beliefs about reality.

Let it go… but not in the boardroom

Study by USC Marshall School of Business and USC faculty illuminates how facial expressions affect cooperation While Disney’s Frozen Academy...

Having – and growing – confidence in your business

The urgent desire for a successful business — and the fear of losing business — drives many a good person to do sleazy things.

10 ways to relaxify your workspace

Some people claim they work well in a high-stress environment. I’m not one of them.

Does success really make people happy?

Happy individuals are predisposed to seek out and undertake new goals in life and this reinforces positive emotions, say researchers who examined the connections between desirable characteristics, life successes and well-being of over 275,000 people.

See yourself as outsiders do to measure progress toward goals

When people feel they’ve hit a roadblock in reaching a personal goal, such as losing weight, a change in perspective may give them the help...

Don’t worry, be happy-ish

Most self-help books on the subject offer tips on how to maximize one’s bliss, but one study suggests that moderate happiness may be preferable to full-fledged elation.

How your brain structure corresponds to personality

Psychological scientists have found that the size of different parts of people’s brains correspond to their personalities; for example, conscientious people tend to have a bigger lateral prefrontal cortex, a region of the brain involved in planning and controlling behavior.

Know thyself: How mindfulness can improve self-knowledge

Research has highlighted the fact that we have many blind spots when it comes to understanding our patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving.

10 tips to help you build and grow a stand-out small business brand

A survey by the Pew Foundation which found that 71 percent of Americans view small business more favorably than any other institutions, including religious organizations.

30 major causes of failure

Life’s greatest tragedy consists of men and women who earnestly try, and fail! The tragedy lies in the overwhelmingly large majority of people who fail, as compared to the few who succeed.

Surprising connections between sleep & gratitude

We all know that getting a good night’s sleep is good for our general health and well-being. But new research is highlighting a more surprising benefit of good sleep: more feelings of gratitude for relationships.

How to kickstart creating a sound business plan

It’s true that you don’t need to create a formal business plan in order to start a business. You can kickstart a business very quickly without...

The science of happiness

Can money buy happiness? Is ignorance truly bliss? Are happy people shallow and unaware of the problems of the world? Can a person be too happy?

Achieving fame, wealth and beauty are psychological dead ends, study says

If you think having loads of money, fetching looks, or the admiration of many will improve your life — think again.

Seeking happiness? Remember the good times, forget the regrets

People who look at the past through rose-tinted glasses are happier than those who focus on negative past experiences and regrets.